Tagged: Rage Against the Machine

Wake Up

Jen Kehl at My Skewed View and Kristi at Finding Ninee host Twisted MixTape Tuesday, a blog hop that’s all about music.  The premise is to create a five song mix based on the week’s theme.  (You can click on the button above if you’d like to play along).  Here’s Jen’s instructions for today’s topic:

A mix to Get Motivated. Whether it’s to workout, write or just get out of bed. Mix it up!

The bloggers of Twisted Mixtape Tuesday took a trip through the decades for our topics last summer and for one of my weeks covering the 1990’s, I mixed songs from that decade that I use to motivate me at the gym, called Angry White Girl Gym Music.  The gym is about the only time that I specifically play music to motivate me, instead of hearing a song then becoming motivated.  Subtle difference, but it makes it kind of tough to narrow down this topic.  So I’m sticking with my gym music for this mixtape as well.

What do I look for when adding to my gym playlists?  Its all about the beat baby and if I can find music that matches my pace on the treadmill, I don’t even notice the time passing or how much my legs feel like spaghetti.  Forget the lyrics, they could be singing Mary Had a Little Lamb because when the drums and the guitars echo my pace and the beat of my heart, I go to my happy place, until I hear something unexpected and get shocked awake, then trip, fall flat on my face and get catapulted off the back of the treadmill.  Yeah, that’s happened.

1.  Space Lord – Monster Magnet.  Love this song for my warm-up.

2.  You – Candlebox.  Another great one while warming up.  This band is responsible for one of my favorite songs (Far Behind) and is astonishingly underrated.

3.  Would? – Alice in Chains.

4.  Siva – Smashing Pumpkins.

5.  Wake Up – Rage Against the Machine.  There are two bands that make up the bulk of my gym music, Disturbed and RATM.  Since I included a Disturbed song on the original mixtape, I’ll let Rage have a spot in this one.

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These Are a Few of My Favorite Things…

Jen Kehl at My Skewed View and Kristi at Finding Ninee host Twisted MixTape Tuesday, a blog hop that’s all about music.  The premise is to create a five song mix based on the week’s theme.  (You can click on the button above if you’d like to play along).  Here’s Jen’s instructions for today’s topic:

Share with us your favorite MixTape from the last year.

Happy New Year Everyone!  Jen has asked us to share our favorite mixtape from the past year.  This one was relatively easy because my top two favorites are both from this summer’s trip through the decades, so I only had to choose between the two weeks that covered the 1990’s music.  Originally posted on July 16, 2013:  Aaaand it goes a little somethin’ like this…

Jen Kehl at My Skewed View and Kristi at Finding Ninee host Twisted MixTape Tuesday, a blog hop that’s all about music. The premise is to create a five song mix based on the week’s theme. (You can click on the button above if you’d like to play along).

Here’s Jen’s instructions for today’s topic: If you were going to make a mix for a friend in the Nineties, what would it contain? This is NOT a best of. This is If You Were You, in the 90′s, and You Were Making A Mix Tape For A Friend (on any topic) What Would It Be?

Before I get into the “meat” of this post, let me warn you up front…the language in this post, in the songs’ lyrics, and the material featured in the videos is NSFW…Not Safe for Work, or small children, or pets, or house plants, or anyone easily offended by language or controversial subject matters. You’ve been warned. Proceed at your own risk.

In 1990, I took a job with an international import company and moved overseas to Hong Kong. In addition to completely flipping my life upside down, I was exposed to more of a global musical culture while drinking Carlsberg or San Miguel in (now) classic HK bars and pubs like Scotties in Lan Kwai Fong. The tiny dance floor was usually so packed on weekends you only had room to jump up and down. The DJ was hot, serving up international dance tunes, most I hadn’t heard before.

But there was also a song, played twice nightly, that stuck in my brain, Special AKA’s Free Nelson Mandela, which was gaining popularity once again due to Mandela’s release earlier in the year and his negotiations to end apartheid. What I didn’t realize I was missing back home in the good ole US of A, was the beginnings of the commercial grunge movement and the cyclical re-emergence of a subset of political/protest music moving away from the apathy of the origins of the genre. Censorship, the first Gulf War, the events surrounding Rodney King and the L.A. riots were all fodder for this generation’s music with a message.

1. We Care A Lot – Faith No More (1987). This “anti-protest” manages to bridge the gap between the isolated Seattle grunge subculture and the evolution to mainstream grunge in the early 90’s. The parody of celebrities jumping on the bandwagon for “causes” in itself became a message and was one of the forerunners of the re-emergence of political and protest rock in the grunge musical style.

2. Man in the Box – Alice in Chains (1991). A very simple lyrical denouncement of censorship through the filter of a very high Layne Staley. “Feed my eyes now you’ve sewn them shut.”

3. Hush – Tool (1991). I love Tool’s big old Fuck You, both musically and visually, to Tipper Gore and her PMRC bobbleheads. Attacking the PMRC (Parents Music Resource Center) became one of the common themes of much of the protest music in the late 80’s and early 90’s. What the PMRC ended up with (the advisory stickers) was very much different from their original agenda of censorship and limiting access to music that didn’t meet their ambiguous and restrictive moral codes.

**side note: the next band on my list also protested against PMRC in a unique way. They spent their whole set time at Lollapalooza standing silently naked on stage with their mouths covered in tape like this:

ratm lollapalooza

4. Killing in the Name – Rage Against the Machine (1992). RATM’s one of most well-known of the political rock giants of this era. Killing in the Name takes on the protest darlings of racism in military, government and police agencies. I can’t wax poetic about this song when its own lyrics say so much more (and so much better) than I could ever manage myself. Just listen.

5. Warfair – Clawfinger (1993). This Swedish rap-metal group is primarily known for its political and anti-racism messages in its music and signifies how the new uprising of political themes in music evolved from grunge to other genres towards the mid-90’s.

“The duty of youth is to challenge corruption.” ~Kurt Cobain

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Just a Perfect Day

Jen Kehl at My Skewed View and Kristi at Finding Ninee host Twisted MixTape Tuesday, a blog hop that’s all about music.  The premise is to create a five song mix based on the week’s theme.  (You can click on the button above if you’d like to play along). Here’s Jen’s instructions for today’s topic:

I wouldn’t love these songs so much if they weren’t part of a Soundtrack. Your favorite songs from soundtracks, could be anywhere from pop music you love to original scores, you decide. Try and use the point of view that it was the Soundtrack that made you love the song.

I completely adore the topic this week as it combines my love of music with my love of film.   I did start thinking too much about it and whether we were to list five songs from the same soundtrack or each from a different movie.  I’m going with the latter for my interpretation and looking at it that whenever I hear the song, I immediately have a mental projection of the movie scene.  Always.  I’m also defining “soundtrack” as what’s scored with the movie and not limiting it to just what’s released on a CD as the official movie soundtrack.

**After compiling my list of songs/movies, I noticed what I took away from each of the scenes emotionally all encompassed sex, drugs, or violence.  I might just be worried about my psychological profile if I didn’t start tearing up every time those Humane Society commercials air.

1.  To Really Love a Woman – Bryan Adams from Don Juan Demarco.  Though the wording of Johnny Depp’s monologue borders on the inane, the delivery is muy caliente.  While he may be most well-known for off-beat quirky character portrayals, he can certainly be sex on a stick when he wants to be.

2.  La Cancion del Mariachi (Morena de Mi Corazon) – Antonio Banderas w/ Los Lobos from Desperado.  I’m sticking with the Latin theme from another song.  Between the bar scene with Quentin Tarantino/Cheech Marin and El Mariachi playing with Quino and Campa while breaking up a barfight without skipping a beat, Robert Rodriguez has one of the best opening movie sequences ever.

3.  Stuck in the Middle With You – Steelers Wheel from Reservoir Dogs.  Speaking of Quentin Tarantino, I don’t know how much of this scene with Mr. Blonde is due to his direction or Michael Madsen’s character portrayal of Mr. Blonde…but it is masterful.  The sadistic expression that comes across as Mr. Blonde dances around in anticipation of torturing the cop is impressive, especially considering the actor himself stated that he had difficulties performing the scene.

4.  Perfect Day – Lou Reed from Trainspotting.  I’m not a big fan of the overall movie.  Friends said I had to see it, so I did.  This one scene was brilliant for the use of the song and portraying the experience of an *altered state*, even when chaos may be the reality surrounding the user.  I wasn’t familiar with the song, but after hearing it in the movie, I couldn’t stop listening to it over and over again.

5.  Take the Power Back – Rage Against the Machine from Natural Born Killers. Though this song and “Bombastic” weren’t actually on the commercially released soundtrack CD, it was used in the movie.  I have this film to thank for my introduction to RATM.  So often music that’s used in the background of a pivotal scene like this gets lost for me, but I definitely took notice in this scene.

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