Tagged: blog hop

One More Cup of Coffee

Jen Kehl at My Skewed View and Kristi at Finding Ninee host Twisted MixTape Tuesday, a blog hop that’s all about music.  The premise is to create a five song mix based on the week’s theme.  (You can click on the button above if you’d like to play along).  Here’s Jen’s instructions for today’s topic:

Great Cover Songs

I know I haven’t joined in for a couple weeks, but my winter blahs are reaching critical mass.  I knew for a fact that I couldn’t miss this week though.  I mean “cover songs” are my thing!

1.  Ain’t No Sunshine – Santana and Rob Thomas.  I just discovered this version of Bill Withers’ hit song a couple weeks ago.  These two make a dynamite duo and I hope they do more collaborations in the future.  I just wish there was a better version online.

2.  One More Cup of Coffee – The White Stripes.  You really can’t throw a rock into a pool of covers and not hit a Bob Dylan song.  Dylan once remarked that this song was written from his experience of a week spent at a Gypsy Festival in France.  I think Jack White does an admirable job in capturing the Dylan-esqueness (yeah I may have just made up that word) of the song.

3.  I Will Always Love You – Chris Cornell Honesty time here…I really dislike this song.  Both Dolly’s version and Whitney’s.  But I ran across this version about a month ago on a playlist and was really getting into it before I even realized what the song was.  Are his vocals as pure as the more famous singers?  Of course not…and that’s probably why I actually like this “rawer” version of the song.  As far as I can by YouTube, the only performance he’s done that was recorded was for an Obama fundraiser a couple years ago.

4.  Street Fighting Man – Oasis Speaking of “raw” songs, I’m usually not a huge Oasis fan, but love this cover of the Rolling Stones’ song.

5.  The Man Who Sold the World – Nirvana.  I did a TMT post a few months back about covers that were better than the originals and included Nirvana’s cover of Where Did You Sleep Last Night.  I had a discussion a few days later with a friend that asked me why I chose to use that Nirvana song from the MTV Unplugged special instead of this one.  My answer was simple…its because I love both Nirvana’s cover and David Bowie’s original of this song and I really don’t think one version is better than the other.

Dream signature

80’s MixTape Part 2: The College Years

Jen Kehl at My Skewed View and Kristi at Finding Ninee host Twisted MixTape Tuesday, a blog hop that’s all about music.  The premise is to create a five song mix based on the week’s theme.  (You can click on the button above if you’d like to play along).

Here’s Jen’s instructions for today’s topic: If you were going to make a mix for a friend in the Eighties, what would it contain? This is NOT a best of. This is If You Were You, in the 80’s, and You Were Making A Mix Tape For A Friend (on any topic) What Would It Be?

The 80’s Part 1 covered the songs that were meaningful to me in my high school years, so for Part 2, we’ll hit the college years.  There really weren’t a lot of pivotal moments during college.  I was either studying, working, drinking, or getting into or out of relationships.  I decided for my college years to focus on songs that remind me of certain people in my life during the last half of the 80’s.   I’ll stick with five songs, three of which are reminiscent of relationships, one of my best friend, and one of a really (really) intense weekend fling.  I’ll let it remain a mystery as to which is which.

1.  The Sweetest Taboo – Sade (1985). 

2.  Under the Milky Way – The Church (1988).

3.  Surrender to Me – Robin Zander & Ann Wilson (1988).

4.  Like the Way I Do – Melissa Etheridge (1988).

5.  Angel Eyes – Jeff Healey Band (1989).

I hope you enjoyed this week’s little interlude because next week, we’re entering the 90’s and I’m going back to hitting the rock…hard.

Dream Sig 3

80’s High School Twisted MixTape

Jen Kehl at My Skewed View and Kristi at Finding Ninee host Twisted MixTape Tuesday, a blog hop that’s all about music.  The premise is to create a five song mix based on the week’s theme.  (You can click on the button above if you’d like to play along).

Here’s Jen’s instructions for today’s topic: If you were going to make a mix for a friend in the Eighties, what would it contain? This is NOT a best of. This is If You Were You, in the 80’s, and You Were Making A Mix Tape For A Friend (on any topic) What Would It Be?

The 80’s are going to be tough for me as that’s when I spent my teen through college years and I have so many fond memories and influential moments that can be captured by my musical choices.

I remember the first day our cable provider added MTV and it changed my little teen world.  I remember the neon clothes and the Madonna-lookalike-wannabes.  Prince’s Purple Rain was our prom theme (along with thousands of other schools apparently as I found out later in life).  We had hair bands and heavy metal, the emergence of hip hop and rap, boy bands/girl bands and the now ever-popular tween-sensations.  It was a time of first crushes and first loves and the inevitable first heartbreak.  There was also my first j-o-b, working in a denim store selling Jordache, Calvin Klein, Sasson, and Gloria Vanderbilt jeans.  My first time as a licensed driver, being all alone behind the wheel in mom’s station wagon with the windows down and the wind in my hair and the stereo blasting while driving to the mall and thinking “How cool am I now?”  (not very)

I honestly don’t think I can stick to a theme for my 80’s lists as I’ve done for my previous decades.  There was just too much happening in such a short period of time.  So for my two weeks in the 80’s, I’m making it a trip down memory lane.  I’m choosing songs that are associated with significant memories or turning points in my high school and college days.  They may not be the most popular songs, the best songs by a particular artist, or even the most likeable, but they serve as touchstones for me in a way.

1.  Let the Music Play – Shannon (1983).  Outside of the enforced dancing in gym mentioned in my last 70’s mixtape, this was the song playing when I had my first “real” dance with a boy.  I was a Junior in high school and one of the clubs I was involved in had a state conference and competition every year.  The last night of the conference, there was always a dance that we dressed up in suits and formals.  The delegation from my school was all female and we spent most of the time dancing in a group.  We were taking a breather at a table when a boy came up and asked me to dance with him.  Me!  Out of all the girls, he chose me.  He led me out onto the dance floor accompanied by cheers and catcalls from my table.  I started a typical geeky side-to-side sway to the beat of this song, only to watch in horror as he started doing some kind of coked-up Tyrolean Shoe Slapping Dance (seen in the first 15 seconds of that video).  While appropriate someplace like Austria, it wasn’t cool in central Florida.  I heard the riot of laughter coming from my table, but politely finished the dance and thanked my partner before slinking back to sit down and be teased the rest of the night.

2.  You’ve Got Another Thing Coming – Judas Priest (1982).  Being a geeky, white girl from the suburbs, heavy metal wasn’t even on my radar until my sophomore high school crush was overheard to mention his favorite band was Judas Priest.  I made it my mission to know everything I could about them and played out the Screaming for Vengeance cassette until I knew all the words to all the songs, all the band members names and what instruments they played and all their previous albums.  We had a few conversations in homeroom and were becoming friends until spring’s Easter break long weekend, he never returned to school.  I never found out what happened to him and even though I’m not quite proud of the original deception, it planted a seed of love for heavy metal and hard rock music in me.  I retained my Judas Priest love and added Black Sabbath, Ozzy Osbourne, Iron Maiden, and many more to music collection.  (A fast forward to the future note:  I was a little disgusted to hear Judas Priest’s The Hellion used in a Honda Odyssey commercials a few years ago.  There is no way in hell you can make a mini-van heavy metal.)

3.  What’s Love Got To Do With It – Tina Turner (1984).  This song was my mantra for most of my senior year as I began to develop an attraction for my best friend’s boyfriend.  It was the biggest taboo, the lowest of the low, the most major girl code crime and it formed the basis of my personal dating code of ethics for the rest of my life.  Never, never, never flirt, date, or sleep with any guy that’s ever been the crush, boyfriend, one-night stand, fiancee or husband of a friend.  I never voiced my thoughts and tried to hide my reaction to him as best I could.  I know I did a good job of it and I don’t think anyone ever guessed the truth.

To this day, I’m ashamed of it, even though its really not something I had any control over.  It was only a physical attraction, though at that age, it can be difficult to separate the physical from the emotional.  But it wasn’t the only time it happened over the course of my dating life.  Looking back, I can understand that I was only really attracted to those that were unavailable to me.  They were safe and I didn’t have the option to put feelings out and risk getting them hurt.  This was also the point in my life when I became a master at masking my true thoughts.

4.  Rock Box – Run D.M.C. (1984).  Even though I had previously heard Sugarhill Gang’s Rapper’s Delight, this Run D.M.C. song was the first rap song to really open my eyes to the genre.  I think what originally caught my attention was the hard rock guitar into as I caught the song for the first time at that point.  Then I was like, “Whoa!  What’s this?!?!” when they started spitting the rhymes.  This was my gateway into rap and hip hop that I still enjoy, but mix it with hard rock and I’m in love (hence my later obsession with Kid Rock and Eminem).   This song has a special memory attached, my first kiss (doesn’t seem like the “first kiss” kinda song, but then I always was a bit different).

5.  Dancing in the Street – David Bowie & Mick Jagger (1985).   There were two weeks left before I was due to leave for college and my friends had planned a going away party for a weekend when one of their parents were out of town.  Unfortunately, it looked like the hurricane that was headed straight for our coastal town decided to crash the party.  Luckily throughout the day, its course changed a bit so we weren’t directly in its path, but we still got a good amount of rain.  The party went on and after a couple hours of drinking, we declared it a Hurricane Party and moved it outside to where it was still intermittently raining.  I don’t remember the exact details because my memory of events after this point become kinda sketchy, but something very clear I remember is a bunch of us dancing in the middle of the street in the rain to this song.  It was one of those moments of friendship I wished would never end.  Things in our lives were getting ready to change forever and we’d never have this again.

So, those are a few of the standout songs and significant moments from the first half of the 80’s up to graduating from high school in 1985.  For the 80’s Part 2 next week, I’ll delve into my college years.

Dream Sig 3

Dazed and Confused

Jen Kehl at My Skewed View and Kristi at Finding Ninee host Twisted MixTape Tuesday, a blog hop that’s all about music.  The premise is to create a five song mix based on the week’s theme.  (You can click on the button above if you’d like to play along).

Here’s Jen’s instructions for today’s topic: If you were going to make a mix for a friend in the Seventies what would it contain? This is NOT a best of. This is If You Were You, in the seventies, and You Were Making A Mix Tape For A Friend (on any topic) What Would It Be?

For a few years in the mid 2000’s, I was a DJ for an internet radio station that ran blocks of themed music.  So for my time slot on Saturday evenings I picked classic rock of the 60’s and 70’s.  I was comfortable and knowledgeable with that genre, so it was a really enjoyable time for me.  My all-time favorite show I did was one I built around the music of the movie Dazed and Confused.

dazed_and_confused_ver2

I listen to this type of music so often that my son, who takes after his father in preferring country music, has taken a liking to it and requests this soundtrack when I’m chauffeuring him around.  So, even though the movie didn’t come out until 1993, I’m dedicating this twisted mixtape to the music featured in the movie which was all released between 1972-1975.

It wasn’t until I was doing some research on Dazed and Confused that I realized how many stars of today were in this movie as virtual unknowns:  Ben Affleck, Milla Jovovich, Parker Posey, Rory Cochrane and my favorite, Matthew McConaughey and his now iconic phrase (used in quite a few of his movies) “Alright. Alright. Alright.”.  I was surprised to learn the story behind how and when he came up with the phrase for the movie.

1.  Free Ride – Edgar Winter Group (released 1972).  Wow.  There’s just no mistaking the guitar intro.  Just wow.

2.  Stranglehold – Ted Nugent (1975).  I’ve been trying to post videos with the original recordings, even if I had to sacrifice video for it, but in this case, this live version from about five years ago is just so mind-blowingly kickass, I had to use it.  So sue me.  Interesting fact I learned while finding a video:  Ted Nugent didn’t sing the vocals on the release of this song, it was Derek St. Holmes.

3.  No More Mr. Nice Guy – Alice Cooper (1973).  I was watching the Dark Shadows movie several days ago and saw Alice Cooper had a cameo performing this song.  That’s what led me to the idea of doing this mixtape for one of the 70’s blogs.  But back to Dazed and Confused, I loved the way they used this song in the movie and I can never hear it without thinking of that poor kid getting paddled by Ben Affleck (among others).  By the way, if you ever come across the cover of this song by Pat Boone…run.  Its so very, very wrong.  I’m still trying not to stab myself in the ears with a pencil.

4.  Show Me The Way – Peter Frampton (1975).  Talk-box!

5.  Tuesday’s Gone – Lynyrd Skynyrd (1973).  In the movie, they used this song during “the morning after” and now I get that “morning after” feeling every time I hear it.  What would a 70’s mixtape be without a little Skynyrd?

Honorable Mention:  The Hurricane – Bob Dylan (1975).  Not only is it Bob Dylan, but there’s an interesting story about this song.

Mr. Blind Postman Wants You Twistin’ Nowhere

Jen Kehl at My Skewed View and Kristi at Finding Ninee host Twisted MixTape Tuesday, a blog hop that’s all about music.  The premise is to create a five song mix based on the week’s theme.  (You can click on the button above if you’d like to play along).

Here’s Jen’s instructions for today’s topic: If you were going to make a mix for a friend in the SIXTIES what would it contain? This is NOT a best of. This is If You Were You, in the Sixties, and You Were Making A Mix Tape For A Friend (on any topic) What Would It Be?

Last week, for the 60’s Part 1, I indulged my inner hippie with some late 60’s rock.  This week I’m going in a different direction and mixing up it up with some Motown.  I’m not limiting it to just artists on the Motown label, but they all have that R&B factor.

1.  Please, Mr. Postman – The Marvelettes (1961).  I remember when I was around 6, the older girl next door had the 45 of this song and after I heard it the first time, I kept begging her to play it over and over again.  A few interesting facts about this song and group:  Marvin Gaye played the drums on the original recording.  This was the first of the Motown label artists to reach the #1 spot on the Billboard Hot 100 list in the pop category.  The Marvelettes were the forerunners of the female R&B groups in the 60’s, paving the way for groups like the Supremes and Martha and the Vandellas.

2.  Twistin’ the Night Away – Sam Cooke (1962).  I know I heard this song several times growing up, but it was hearing it in the movies Animal House and Innerspace that cemented my love for it.  Who can resist a drunk Martin Short dancing Ed Grimley-style with a miniaturized Dennis Quaid inside his body?

3.  Nowhere to Run – Martha & the Vandellas (1965).  The first time I actually remember hearing this song was in the movie Good Morning Vietnam, but it was the perfect song for the perfect moment.  Whenever I hear it now, I just want to dance.

4.  I’d Rather Go Blind – Etta James (1968).  I’m at a loss to describe the emotion this song evokes in me when Etta sings it.  She’s just too fabulous for mere words.   Its beauty is in the simplicity of the way she sings it, putting the emotion into her voice instead of using a bunch of vocal gymnastics.  Beyonce’s version from Cadillac Records pales in comparison, but if you’d like a great cover of the song, check out Beth Hart & Jeff Beck.  A very different style from Etta’s version, but just as emotional.

5.  I Want You Back – Jackson 5 (1969 release, didn’t hit the charts til 1970).  I just can’t do two posts of the 60’s and not mention the Jackson’s at all.  I’m not a huge fan of the Jacksons overall, but there are a few songs I really like.  And this one I REALLY love.

MixTape Tuesday: Woke Up With the Blues

I happened upon this blog hop last week and I couldn’t wait to participate because of my love of music.  The premise is this:  Try and create a 5 song mix this week, based on this week’s theme, which is Song’s We Love to Jam/Sing Our Hearts Out to in Our Cars.  Click on the button above if you’d like to play along too.

I was not blessed with the kind of singing voice that anyone else should have to suffer hearing.  I’m well aware of this failing and I do take the rest of humanity into consideration and don’t inflict it upon anyone else.  Except my son when he’s trapped in the car with me.

I wanted to try to stick with the “mix-tape” style and have my songs relate to each other in some way.  Since my musical tastes are uber-eclectic, that might have taken all week.  So I decided to stick in the genre I was feeling today…Blues.

I have a long-standing affinity for blues music, going back to my youth and a pool-playing father and grandfather.  One of my early memories is a smoke-filled poolhall with sticky floors and old men laughing against a background of an unmistakable bluesy beat.  Anytime I’m in my car and playing the blues, you can guarantee I’m wailing right along with the singer (and I pity anyone outside of the car that happens to hear me).

1.  Mannish Boy – I love this version with Muddy Waters and Johnny Winter.  This is the epitome of a blues song.  How can you not love this beat?

2.  Further On Up the Road – Eric Clapton and Joe Bonamassa.  There are more “bluesy” versions of this song, but the combination of these two modern-day blues guitar powerhouses makes an incredible version of this song that always gets me dancing in my seat behind the wheel.

3.  She Just Wants to Dance – Keb Mo.  This is another one that I belt out while swaying in my seat.

4.  The House is Rockin’ – Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble.  I can’t comprise a blues jam list without some southern rock blues and I had to include this one.

5.  Bad to the Bone – George Thorogood and the Destroyers.  This is the ultimate in the evolution of blues to rock.  I don’t care where I am, even in the middle of the town square at a stop light, its windows down and crank-it-all-the-way-up, singing out loud and off-key and just not giving a damn who hears.

There’s my top 5 jam to/sing to in the car and it was tough just narrowing it down and keeping it on point with the theme.  I kept getting sidetracked with other blues music, but I did find a few versions of my favorites that I hadn’t heard before and that’s never time wasted.